Thursday, April 18, 2019

Sourdough Waffles & Start Information



Here it is! Can you believe it? After 4 years, the iconic recipe of this blog is finally being posted haha... sorry about that. This recipe is a family secret that has been passed down for generations. So if I go missing, you'll know my grandma is punishing me 😉 just kidding! I'm sure she will be thrilled to not have to write it down for everyone in the family!




We love these waffles so much. They are amazing topped with all the regular things like: whipped cream, maple syrup, berries, and peaches. My mother has also been simply spreading butter on her waffle and eating it plain for years, which I have found now is SO good! I'm pretty sure there is no bad way to eat these babies. Crank up the iron and whip those egg whites, you're about to have the more unreal experience of your life.


Please let me know if you have any questions! I am in no way a sourdough expert, but I am connected to many 😉
xo,
Gretta 



Sourdough Waffles
Yield: 10-12 waffles, about 4-5 people
INGREDIENTS:
About 1 to 2 cups Sourdough Start
2 cups flour
2 cups warm water
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup oil
3 eggs
1 teaspoon soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon powder


DIRECTIONS:
1) In a large mixing bowl, combine 1 1/2 to 2 cups of sourdough start, flour, and warm water. Stir and cover
overnight or for at least 6 hours. (Don't forget to feed the remainder of your start after you use it).
2) After resting, add sugar and oil and mix.
3) Separate eggs, and add egg yolks to the mixture. Save whites for later.
4) Stir until all ingredients are well combined.
5) Sprinkle soda, salt and powder on top of the batter. Fold to combine.
6) Whip egg whites until stiff. Using a folding motion (lift from the bottom and bring through the middle),
stir in the egg whites. Careful to not break the air bubbles which help to create fluffy waffles.
7) Cook in a preheated waffle iron until golden brown. Spray with Pam between waffles to prevent sticking.

Toppings: Fresh whipped cream, berries or peaches, maple syrup and most importantly, we love to add
chopped pecans into our batter right before we close the iron.  Yum!

Freezing: We always freeze our leftover waffles, if we have them, and heat them up in the toaster for the
next couple days. I'm not sure how long they should be stored, they never last more than a couple days at our house!
Before you freeze them, let them sit out for a couple hours to dry so that you don't get freezer burn.


Sourdough Start Information:
First off, I am NOT a pro at sourdough. These are the things I have learned from my mom and grandmother. But
hopefully they will help you on the path to amazing sourdough!

1) What is a sourdough start?: A sourdough start is a mixture of different bacteria and yeast, mixed with flour and
water to "feed it". Because of what it's made up of, there are different strains of sourdough start. They use different
bacteria and usually will taste different depending on the start! For example the famous San Francisco Sourdough
will taste different than the start we use for our waffles, which is pretty mild. The start our family uses came from my
great great great grandfather who got it from a sheep herder!  

1) Getting a sourdough start: So, how do you get one? Find a friend or family member who has a sourdough start
and ask them to share. You can make your own start too, but it can take a couple of weeks. To avoid the hassle all you
need is a small amount from someone else's start to take home and feed.  I have also heard that some bakeries
(or whole food stores) will give you a start for free!

2) Feeding your start: Your start needs to be fed regularly, but time differ depending on if you keep it in the fridge
or out on the counter. The start that everyone in our family uses (it's all the same because we share) can go dormant
in the fridge. I'm not sure if that's how all starts works, you can ask whoever you got it from how to take care of it.
We store our start in the fridge and then we feed it a couple days before we will use it if we haven't gotten it out in a
while. Make sure you dump out some of your start if it is close to the top so so it doesn’t overflow the container.
To feed your start, add flour and warm water and stir it all up. When you store a sourdough start in the fridge, it will
have some clear or light yellow or brownish liquid at the top. I usually pour this off before I feed my start, but you can
mix it in if you want, either way is fine. I have read articles that say you should use about 1 cup flour to 1/2 cup warm
water, but that seems like a lot of flour. It's hard to pinpoint because your start might be more or less wet than another
one. Just make sure it has a thick but wet consistency. It should be a thick, sticky batter that can slowly pour out. It
shouldn't be too watery and it also shouldn't be like a dough. After feeding, let it sit and ferment for 12-24 hours until
it's all bubbly, then you can put it back in the fridge.

3) Using your start for dough: When you use your start, you can use a lot of it. It only takes about 1/2 cup or less
to continue to grow! For our waffle recipe you will need about 1 to 2 cups of start. If you don't have enough, feed your
start a couple days before to build up your store. After you use your start, be sure to feed it and let it sit out to grow
about 24 hours before you put it back in the fridge.

Questions? Comment below!

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